Nativity Challenge

BJ Rudge, Ph.D.

While the nativity story provides opportunity to reflect upon an incredible event in history, it also has great meaning for us today.

A crucial aspect of the nativity is the trust and obedience of Mary and Joseph. Both demonstrated extraordinary faith in their commitment to God and to following His will, regardless of the cost (Matthew 1:18-25; Luke 1:28-38). So too, God wants to use ordinary people today who will have extraordinary faith and commitment to trust and obey Him no matter what the circumstances.

Upon hearing the good news of a Savior, from the angel of the Lord, the shepherds hurried to Bethlehem to see the baby lying in a manger. They departed glorifying and praising God for the birth of the Savior (Luke 2:8-20). In the midst of commercialism, where the true meaning of Christmas can be obscured or lost altogether, may we be like the shepherds in giving praise and glory to our Savior and Lord.

The Wise Men chose to travel hundreds of arduous miles to worship “He who has been born King of the Jews” (Matthew 2:2). Likewise, may we choose to walk the challenging journey of faith and obedience to Jesus Christ. The rewards at the end will be well worth it.

May this Christmas be more than just the remembrance of a past event or an outpouring of holiday spirit. May the true meaning of the nativity be evident in our lives and homes.

Lily Sings

Bill and Karen Rudge’s granddaughter, Lily Smith, was the featured singer in the song “Bonse Aba,” arranged by Andrew Fischer, at her high school’s Christmas concert. Here is a video of the performance followed by the lyrics with the English translation.

Lily Smith sings at her high school concert.

Bonse Aba
Traditional Zambian folksong
 
Bonse aba mu pokelela
Bali pele maka
Akuba bana (Repeat)
Kuba Bana (Repeat)
Kuba Bana
Bakwa Lesa.

Loosely translated in English:

All people who accept
His authority
Are his children
Are children
Are children
In the power of God.

More Than It Seemed

Jim Weikal

Just think! The angel reported to Joseph that the child conceived in Mary by the Holy Spirit would “save His people from their sins” (Matthew 1:20-21). This child was also called the Lamb of God, the only Savior, and the reconciler of sinners (John 1:29; Acts 4:12; Colossians 1:22).

What appeared to be a natural birth of a Jewish child in Bethlehem was more than it seemed. Decades later this child made possible peace between a holy God and hostile, alienated, sinful people. He accomplished this feat “in His fleshly body through death, in order to present you before Him holy and blameless and beyond reproach” (Colossians 1:22).