Meek and Powerful

By Bill Rudge

“Do not be as the horse or as the mule which have no understanding …” Psalm 32:9

Photo by Bill Rudge

Throughout the Scriptures we frequently see the word “meek.” Many wrongly equate the meaning of meek with its rhyming word, weak. But that could not be further from the truth. When the Lord said in Matthew 5:5, “Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth,” He was talking about those who will rule and reign with Him.

While in Bible college, I learned that the word meek referred, in the Greek, to a strong war horse prepared for battle. With just the slightest touch on the reins, the horse would go in the intended direction of the rider. It became submissive and sensitive to the rider on its back. The horse had not lost any of its drive or dynamic power as a strong stallion, but was completely under the mastery of the rider. If its spirit was broken, its strength compromised or its dynamic qualities changed, then it would have been useless for its purpose; but brought under control and submissive, it was said that the horse was now praus (translated meek or prautes, translated meekness throughout the New Testament).

Vine’s Expository Dictionary states:

It is that temper of spirit in which we accept His [God’s] dealings with us as good, and therefore without disputing or resisting; and as such, we do not fight … struggle and contend with Him …. It must be clearly understood, therefore, that the meekness manifested by the Lord and commended to the believer is the fruit of power. The common assumption is that when a man is meek it is because he cannot help himself; but the Lord was “meek” because He had the infinite resources of God at His command.

Out Of Control

When horseback riding as a teen, the horse I was on was determined to knock me off. It tried to smash my legs by continually running about two inches from the trees. I had to keep pulling one of my feet out of the stirrups and lift my leg over to the other side of the saddle to avoid having it smashed against a tree. When that didn’t work, the horse tried to “clothesline” me a few times by going underneath low branches. I had to keep ducking down to avoid getting knocked off.

There I was on this out-of-control horse, pulling as hard as I could on the reins in an attempt to stop it or even slow it down – so hard that its mouth was bleeding. But it would not stop; it ran even faster trying all the harder to knock me off. Finally, so upset with my trying to slow it down, the horse impulsively ran off the trail and burst through a barbed-wire fence in racing back to the corral. Its chest had multiple gashes, blood mixed with sweat streaming down. My pants were ripped and my legs had several cuts.

That horse was rebellious! I could not control or lead it. God does not want you to be like that horse because you will bring destruction on yourself. He tells us to be meek, humble and yielded so He can work in us; so He can speak to our hearts and lead us where He wants, without having to hit us over the head to get our attention!

Do not be as the horse or as the mule which have no understanding, whose trappings include bit and bridle to hold them in check (Psalm 32:9).

Dynamic Strength

The praus horse also had a bit and bridle, but to get it to obey one did not have to yank the reins and bit or bloody its mouth. Instead, one lightly pulled on the reins to guide and direct the horse: It willingly followed the master’s direction. God is not telling us either to be weak or a doormat. He is saying, “Have your dynamic strength, but do not resist and fight Me. Be submitted to Me.”

Instead of being stiff-necked, obstinate, hardhearted and rebellious, let’s be praus. Let’s be sensitive, submissive, surrendered, yielded and available so God will work in and through us to accomplish His purpose for our lives!

Excerpted from Reaching Your Maximum Potential in Christ which is being updated and expanded for its third printed edition and E-book.

Cub Scouts Meet the Challenge of the Obstacle Course

By Darlinda McDonald

Last month, members of Cub Scout Pack 3 of Sharon were ready to face the challenge. They were very excited as they approached the “Ultimate Challenge Obstacle and Fitness Course” at Bill Rudge Ministries.

Before leading the scouts through the course, Bill Rudge began the evening with “Coronavirus Kickball, Soccer Style.” He invented the game to help maintain as much social distancing as possible for the scouts. Similar to baseball, the field used tires for bases. Each player who was up would kick the ball and run to the bases while the team in the field retrieved the large “soccer ball” with their feet and tried to kick the ball to touch any of the four tires before the person running was safe on one of the bases. The referees on both sides judged whether the scout was safe or out.

Next up was the obstacle course, which had been recently renovated. The scouts partnered with their parents as they navigated each obstacle after attentively listening to Rudge’s instructions. They climbed, they crawled, they jumped, and they strove to keep their balance as they met each challenge. Their determination, positive attitude and a willingness to try each obstacle, even if feeling a little hesitant, was inspiring. It was enjoyable to lead this group of young boys as they persevered through the course. As each scout completed the final obstacle, they raced to the course entrance with a big smile on their face to clang the large silver bell.

The obstacle course provides awesome opportunities to challenge children, teens, and adults. It is used to teach and train various youth and adult groups, scouts, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, sports teams, civic and church groups, and the military (Army, Navy, Marines) as well as those preparing for basic training, all at no charge.

Showing Christ to the World

By Jim Weikal

A rich, young ruler (Matthew 19:20; Mark 10:17; Luke 18:18) runs up to Jesus who was setting out on a journey, and he asks Jesus what he can do to inherit eternal life. Jesus then lists six of the ten commandments. The young man states that he has kept these commandments since his youth (probably age 13).

Jesus lovingly says to the man, “One thing you lack: go and sell all you possess and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow Me” (Mark 10:21).

The young man became sad and gloomy at our Lord’s words, and he left grieving “for he was one who owned much property” (Mark 10:22).

You see, our Christian walk is more than words. It is easy to believe the best about ourselves. But it’s our actions that prove our faith is genuine. Abraham proved his faith by his willingness to sacrifice Isaac (Genesis 22:12).

While we are not saved by works, our works should demonstrate that our faith is real. After all, true believers are created in Christ “for good works, which God prepared beforehand so that we would walk in them” (Ephesians 2:10).

So seek God’s face and ask Him what you can do to honor Him. This way an unbelieving world will see Him through you.